chris.emery@mainstreet-tech.com

Chris Emery

About Chris Emery

Chris has helped hundreds of financial institutions of varying asset sizes and employing all major core systems implement allowance technology that supports their efforts to comply with regulatory and accounting standards, including in their current transition to estimating the allowance under CECL.

Proposed ASU – Codification Improvements—Financial Instruments – What’s New on the CECL Front?

When FASB released the CECL ASU in June 2016, the defining theme through the ASU was the flexibility given to preparers with regard to the new expected losses standard. Since this time, there have been many discussions and buckets of ink spilled on the interpretation of the guidance released, but no new ASUs released that actually changed the guidance. While ASU 2018-19 was issued in late 2018, all this really did was make some clarifications and changes around the effective date of the standard for private companies, essentially extending the adoption date for those companies to Q1 2022. However, the first proposed ASU with substantial changes to the codification has now been proposed as of November 19th, 2018 with a comment period ending on January 18th, 2019. This ASU addressed many of the issues that have been brought up and discussed in the Transition Resource Group (TRG) formed by FASB to look at the implementation of the standard, as well as other issues brought up by stakeholders to FASB. We’re going to spend the next series of blog posts looking at a few of these issues and how they will affect the implementation of the standards for financial institutions. For reference, the proposed ASU can be found on FASB’s website here under the title 11/19/18: Proposed Accounting Standards Update—Codification Improvements—Financial Instruments. The issues are numbered in the update, and we will use the same number scheme to be consistent. Issue 1A: Accrued Interest One of the issues that came up at the June 11, 2018 meeting of the TRG was the issue of Accrued Interest. In CECL, the estimate of credit losses is to be based on the amortized cost basis of the asset. This is defined in the glossary of the ASU [...]

2019-01-18T10:08:46+00:00January 18th, 2019|Blog, CECL, CECL Accounting|

What is the PD/LGD Transition Matrix Model for CECL?

The transition matrix model (TMM) determines the probability of default (PD) of loans by tracking the historical movement of loans between loan states over a defined period of time – for example, from one year to the next – and establishes a probably of transition for those loan types between different loan states. […]

2018-10-24T11:14:12+00:00October 19th, 2018|CECL, Methodologies|